5 Stars, Reviewed by Jennifer, Samantha Cayto, Sci-Fi/Fantasy/Urban Fantasy, Totally Bound

Review: The Captain’s Pet by Samantha Cayto

Title: The Captain’s Pet

Author: Samantha Cayto

Publisher: Totally Bound

Pages/Word Count: 134 Pages

At a Glance: While filled with non-con and dub-con, this novel offers up a great sci-fi world and is the promising start of a series.

Reviewed By: Jennifer

Blurb: When a distant planet’s ownership is in dispute, conquering aliens turn defiant human males into pampered sex slaves.

In a not-too-distant future, a lopsided war has led to aliens invading and occupying an Earth settlement. Wid is a young colonist who has been caught harassing the aliens. He and his friends are rounded up and sent to an alien warship patrolling the disputed space. His fate is to serve as a sex slave for the ship’s imposing captain. Wid, at first, fights against his enslavement, but soon learns that not only does he stand no chance against the much larger and stronger captain, he isn’t sure he even wants to.

Like all Travian males, Kell is bound by duty to defend his people. Having risen to the rank of captain, he nevertheless chafes against the boring and endless patrol of the space invaded by the humans. His misses his family and constantly guards against his scheming first officer. He sees his reward of a human sex slave as more of a nuisance. Yet the pretty, fair-haired human’s exotic allure is hard to resist. He finds far more pleasure in the use of his pet than he would like.

Kept naked and leashed, Wid’s days are filled with boredom, while his nights wrapped in Kell’s arms turn from fear into pleasure. Even as the humans plot their escape, Wid and Kell form a bond and their growing affection cannot be ignored. When tensions boil over among the aliens, Wid and his friends may be Kell and his crew’s only chance for survival.

Reader Advisory: This book contains sex scenes of both non-consensual and dubious consent, as well as scenes of violence, abuse and torture.

Dividers

Review: Before you purchase this book, please be aware of the reader advisory. This book has a lot of sex, and about 90% of it is non-consensual/rape or, at the very least, dubious consent. There is also a lot of violence in the form of abuse and torture.

That said, I liked this book way more than I should have, given the content, but the world was incredibly well crafted and the characters even more so. The non-con/dub-con, while difficult, serves the purpose of displaying how different humans are from the Travians. They hold very different codes of conduct.

In this novel, Earth is overpopulated and has sent humans to colonies on other planets. Wid and his family and friends live on the planet they call “Seven.” After arriving there and settling, they discover, while uninhabited, it belongs to the physically and technologically superior Travians. These aliens are humanoid but much larger, and with a different social structure. I loved that females were in charge of government and men served as the military. Girls go to school, boys are trained. It was nice to see women in a leadership role in a sci-fi novel. That doesn’t happen too often, especially in M/M novels.

After being caught misbehaving, Wid and friends are captured. The girl in their group is released, and you later find out it’s because she’s a woman, and the Travians respect her, even if she is a lowly human.

Again, pretty awesome.

What happens to Wid, Joel, Stuart and the others on the ship, however, is not awesome. They’re captured and as punishment, they are gifted as sexual pets for the Travian males. Gay or straight they are forced into beds every night, and while at first brutal, the rape (let’s not sugarcoat it) becomes less difficult. Their days are spent in relative leisure. Sure, they’re held captive, but they have all the food they could want, and healing waters. Doesn’t make what happens to them at night right, though.

Wid and Kell are fantastic. Wid is defiant and becomes the de facto leader of the boys. He also struggles internally. While he hates what happens to him, and his consent being taken away, he can’t help when his body reacts positively toward the Travian. And slowly he starts to warm up to him, even if he doesn’t want to.

Kell, on the other hand, is the captain, and he hates what he has to do, but he does it in order to keep control of his ship. If he didn’t, his crew would consider him weak, and mutiny. But he still manages to do his best for Wid, given their circumstances. He takes his requests into consideration, and when Stuart is mistreated, Kell takes him away from his owner and gives him to Narith, who is gentle with Stuart.

Even though it’s in the background, I really liked Narith and Stuart, and I hope to see more of their relationship develop. I want to know what happens behind their doors because, despite everything, they seemed so affectionate towards each other, and it warmed my heart.

There are some tense moments at the end of the book that involve a mutiny and rebellion, but it was awesome, and I don’t want to give any of that way. Just know that I really enjoyed this book and can’t wait to read the next in the series. If non-con and dub-con doesn’t bother you too much, I recommend checking this one out.

TNA_Signature_Jennifer







 

You can buy The Captain’s Pet here:

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Amazon Digital Services, Kol Anderson, Self-Published

Submit To Kol Anderson’s “Slave”



“Something unappeased, unappeasable, is within me; it longeth to find expression. A craving for love is within me, which speaketh itself the language of love.” – Friedrich Nietzsche



I’ve previously read two books from this author that I absolutely loved, so I knew what I was getting myself in for when I started reading this one.

Jesse is a sub let go by his cheating Dom, Matt, after a three year relationship. Jesse is at a loss on what to do. He’s been replaced in Matt’s life. He must find a way to get him back at any cost. He seeks out a Dom named Noah, who is known for his sadistic treatment of his subs. Jesse’s time with Noah is not for the faint of heart. It’s blatant torture and abuse, and at times, a little hard to read. Jesse wants this from Noah, craves it, needs to feel something other than his broken heart. I loved how the author put us in that room, made us feel Jesse’s desperation.

The bulk of the story is told from Jess’s POV, so at first I really didn’t like Matt. How could he leave Jesse all alone and lost? After seeing the way he took care of Jesse after a session with Noah, there was no doubt Matt still loved him. He showed such tenderness and concern for Jesse’s well being that it was hard for me to understand why he would leave him. I’m glad we got to see a bit of Matt’s perspective too, we finally know why he felt he couldn’t live up to Jesse’s expectations. Jesse sees him as more than a person, has put him on a pedestal, but he’s just a regular guy and feels as though Jesse will be better off with someone else.

Now Noah has a story to tell. We don’t get much from him in this story, but I would love to know why he needs to give out harsh punishments to subs. He seems so sad and lonely. He wants Jesse for his own, but knows it’s never going to happen. Is this why he was so hard on Jesse? I’m intrigued by the many layers this character must have.

This is a short story with some life lessons the characters learn the hard way. This isn’t a story for the person who wants sunshine and happy times. This is a story of someone in pain, who has been pushed aside and let go by the one person who is everything in his world.

This is a HEA story, despite the dark beginning. Highly recommend it!!!

Reviewed by: Lynn

You can buy Slave here:

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Cornelia Grey, Gryvon, Scarlet Blackwell, Storm Moon Press

The Smoking Gun – Weight of a Gun II from Storm Moon Press

But, you know, sex is controversial, it just is and it always will be. – Liam Neeson

There’ve been so many times I’ve read a book and thought that it was probably the right book but, for whatever reason, the timing was wrong for me, and looking back at my original review of 2012’s Weight of a Gun, I’m thinking that it may have happened to me with one of the stories in the original anthology because I possibly rated it a little lower than it deserved, which makes me want to go back and read it again. Why? Because I thought its sequel was really kinda awesome.

Weight of a Gun II is a collection of three short stories, but only one of them is an actual sequel: Gryvon’s The Inquisitor, the follow-up to The Machinist, which is an Alt U erotic fantasy set in a world where a man, Lord Harrow, knows the value of a brilliant machinist like Avery Belfour, a man who possesses the rare skill to repair and operate the vast weapons technology that Harrow is collecting. Avery begins as little more than Harrow’s captive and property, but in this installment of the series, it becomes obvious that Avery is so much more; it becomes obvious that Harrow wants to possess Avery in a very personal and intimate way. Not that he hasn’t already possessed the man in just about every physical position imaginable.

But there’s someone whose come to reclaim what Harrow has vowed is his, someone to whom Harrow has absolutely no intention of surrendering Avery, but then there’s something that gets to Avery first and by way of an incredible journey between life and death, takes the decision out of Harrow’s hands.

This story is not only erotic but there’s a plot, too, one that was unique and that put my imagination to work, which I think is exactly what I was looking for right now. There’s obviously more to come with Avery and Harrow because this one ends in one heck of a cliffhanger, and I can’t wait to see what Gryvon has in store for these men next. I’m sure whatever it is, Harrow will make it intense in the way only he can. – 4.5 Stars

The second in the collection is Scarlet Blackwell’s Playing With the Big Boys, and where Gryvon’s story was very much the right one for me at the right time, I think this one would fall somewhere in the gray area of wrong story at the wrong time, especially with the unfortunate luck of it being sandwiched between two very different and plot-tastic books. This one pushed quite a few of my no-no buttons, and it wasn’t that the story was poorly written, it isn’t, but it’s the storyline itself that just didn’t work for me.

Where The Inquisitor (and Cornelia Grey’s story) plied me with juicy and brainy plot elements to sink into, Playing With the Big Boys is little more than an extended and orchestrated set up of sex that didn’t come across as convincing so much as gratuitous, which had everything to do with the fact that it wasn’t a story as much as a vehicle to introduce and provoke the debate between what’s consensual and what’s non-consensual sex.

Things started out with a presumed criminal abduction when law enforcement officer Caleb Baker and his partner Dennis are set to raid a warehouse filled with stolen electronics. I say presumed because the entire scenario that happened after Caleb enters the warehouse was orchestrated by Dennis as a lesson to Caleb, a sexual set-up of questionable credibility, which then quickly evolves into a near romantic relationship in the end between Caleb and one of his alleged captors/pseudo-rapists.

There was absolutely nothing wrong with the telling of this story and fans of the author, or fans of extended sex scenes, should love this one. For me, it just wasn’t the story I wanted to be told at the moment. – 2 Stars

Wrapping things up is Cornelia Grey’s Benjamin Pepperwhistle and the Fantabulous Circus of Wonders, the story of a man who runs away from his master and joins the circus; more specifically, he runs away to join Cole Beauchamp, the greatest pistoleer of all time.

Benjamin has a thing for guns, for the smell of gunpowder, and for this particular man who handles a weapon like it’s an extension of his body. As Benjamin tries to find his place among the circus folk, and specifically to carry out his role as Cole’s assistant in a show if spectacular skill and marksmanship, the chemistry between them is a slow burn, one that begins with Cole’s practiced indifference but soon becomes a thing of intense interest when he—and, unfortunately, an entire audience—witnesses firsthand the things Cole can do to Benjamin’s body with little more than putting Benjamin in his gun’s sight.

I’ve never been disappointed in a Cornelia Grey story, and I’m not about to start now. There was a whimsical feel to this one that is owed entirely to the circus atmosphere, but it was, at the same time, sensual in the extreme. The author targets the erotic potential of danger and the allure of the kinkier side of passion. I loved the blend of sweet and sexy, and thought it was the perfect ending to this trilogy of stories about guns and the men who love them. – 4.5 Stars

You can buy Weight of a Gun II here:

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