Mia Kerick

Spotlight Tour and Excerpt: A Hard Day’s Night by Mia Kerick

A Hard Day's NightBook Description: High school senior Kalin (Lennon) Macready knows several facts for certain: John Lennon is his hero. Beaumont Finley Danforth (Fin) is his best friend. And—this is the complicated one—he feels more for Fin than mere friendship.

For weeks, Lennon pesters Fin, who like Lennon admits to questioning his sexual orientation, for a commitment to spend twenty-four hours together exploring “the gay side of life.” Each boy will seek to answer the terrifying question, Am I gay? Fin reluctantly agrees. Lennon pre-plans the day, filling the hours with what he assumes “gay life” is all about: funky hairstyles, fancy coffee drinks, shopping for fashionable clothing, boogying to Taylor Swift’s “Shake it Off”, and yes, listening to show tunes.

However, Lennon quickly realizes that in creating his plan he has succumbed to the most common and distorted gay stereotypes. Can he be gay and not fit them? And more importantly, is it possible that spending twenty-four hours together will convince Fin that he’s gay, too? If so, maybe Lennon has a shot at winning the heart of the boy of his dreams.

“A Hard Day’s Night” is a humorous young adult contemporary romance about two boys coming to realize that they don’t have to be a stereotype to be genuine.

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Excerpt: I park directly in front of the salon.

“The Best Little Hair House in Westfield?” Fin looks at me incredulously but doesn’t dish out a criticism. My dear friend Fin has great difficulty with that whole “calling it like he sees it” thing.
“I didn’t name the place,” I mutter as I jump out of the Jeep. After shaking his curly blond head a couple of times in what-did-I-get-myself-into disbelief, Fin does the same.
I’ll be sorry to see those pretty curls on the floor of the beauty salon, but we’re gonna endure our mutual makeover, one way or another.
In my opinion, having mutual makeovers spells togetherness as well as exploring our more feminine sides. “Come on. We have both of the salon’s haircutters booked for the next hour.” Then I mumble in a manner designed to be intentionally incoherent, “And we have a makeup artist for the following forty-five minutes….” Fin doesn’t hear this part and I think it’s for the best.
“Daaahlings, you must be Lennon and Fin….” Richard, I assume, since I recognize his sing-song voice from the phone call I made to set up our appointments, greets us at the door, air-kissing me and Fin, on both cheeks. I know immediately that if my goal is to immerse Fin and me in all things homosexual, we are in the right place. I find it hard to tear my eyes off Fin as he checks out the salon. I’ll sum up the salon’s décor like this: rainbow-glitter-velvet-jelly-bean-explosion. And I’m pretty sure that Fin, coming from a lifestyle enhanced by the subtle shades of Williams-Sonoma and Restoration Hardware, has never laid eyes on anything quite this… this vibrant. And Richard’s lilting voice one more time sings out proudly, “Welcome to the Hair House!”
At this point, Fin, with extremely wide eyes, checks out the slick-haired narrow-eyed man who is going to beautify him. Not that Fin needs any enhancement in that department, whatsoever, because even if I weren’t gay, I’d recognize that Fin is a stunner. “I… um… thank you,” he says and offers his hand, which Richard grasps, lifts dramatically to his lips, and kisses very slowly.
“And I must insist that you call me Chard—all of my dearest friends do,” the stylist utters, a glimmer of hopefulness blatant in his sly, dark eyes.
Fin’s lips move but no sound comes out. He’s probably trying to formulate the words for what he is thinking: Are you kidding me—you call yourself Chard? Hahahaha!! But with no success, as Fin, like I mentioned before, has trouble with calling upside-down black heart shapes with tiny stems what they are—yeah, spades.

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Mia KerickAbout the Author: Mia Kerick is the mother of four exceptional children—all named after saints—and five nonpedigreed cats—all named after the next best thing to saints, Boston Red Sox players. Her husband of twenty-two years has been told by many that he has the patience of Job, but don’t ask Mia about that, as it is a sensitive subject.

Mia focuses her stories on the emotional growth of troubled young people and their relationships, and she believes that physical intimacy has a place in a love story, but not until it is firmly established as a love story. As a teen, Mia filled spiral-bound notebooks with romantic tales of tortured heroes (most of whom happened to strongly resemble lead vocalists of 1980s big-hair bands) and stuffed them under her mattress for safekeeping. She is thankful to Dreamspinner Press, Harmony Ink Press, CoolDudes Publishing, and CreateSpace for providing her with alternate places to stash her stories.

Mia is a social liberal and cheers for each and every victory made in the name of human rights, especially marital equality. Now marital equality is the law of the land!! WOOT!! Her only major regret: never having taken typing or computer class in school, destining her to a life consumed with two-fingered pecking and constant prayer to the Gods of Technology.

Author Links: Website || Facebook || Amazon || Author Page

Buy Links: Amazon || AllRomance E-Books


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A Sneak Peek At The Coming Week

Here’s a Sneak Peek at the Coming Week

Sneak Peek

Hi, friends and fellow reading addicts, welcome back to another peek into the future at The Novel Approach, and a teaser of who we have visiting with us in the coming week.

We’ve got a great lineup of guest authors to share with you, along with giveaways, and, of course, many more reviews too.

Here’s what’s on tap!

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Monday – Author BA Tortuga kicks off our week this week on the tour for The Articles of Release, book two in the Release Series

Tuesday – Today we’ll be welcoming author Lexi Ander to TNA on the tour for her latest novel Dragon’s Eye

We’ll also have author Ingela Bohm joining us today to chat a bit about her new novel Last Communion

Wednesday – We’ll have author KC Burn dropping by today as a featured author on the Countdown to GayRomLit 2015 Celebration

We also have Carole Cummings and Andrew Q. Gordon stopping in for a new edition of Genre Talk

Thursday – We’ll be starting October (!!!) off with author Skylar M. Cates and an exclusive cover reveal for her upcoming Dreamspinner holiday story A Guy’s Thanksgiving

We’ll also have author AF Henley with us to chat about their new novel Wolf WY

Friday – Rounding out the second of our GayRomLit Blog Tour visits this week will be author Jaime Reese, filling us in on what she likes most about GRL

Mia Kerick will also join us today on the tour for her new book A Hard Day’s Night

And, we’ll have yet another edition of Flashback Friday for you today too

Saturday – Finally, to close out the week, we’ll have author Lex Chase here with us to chat about her new novel Bayou Fairy Tale

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And that, as they say, is that! Until next week, happy reading!

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3.5 Stars, Audio Book, Dreamspinner Press, Genre Romance, Mia Kerick, Narration Rating - 5 Stars, Reviewed by Amy

Audio Review: Random Acts by Mia Kerick

Title: Random Acts

Author: Mia Kerick

Narrator: Iggy Toma

Publisher: Dreamspinner Press

Run Time: 8 Hours

At a Glance:  I absolutely LOVED this book for the first 5 hours of Random Acts!

Reviewed By: Amy

Blurb: Bradley Zelder can’t find his way in life. After struggling for nearly a decade, he has yet to complete his college degree. Working as a school custodian, living in blue-collar Landsbury, MA, his love life is as empty as the rest of his existence. But on his way home after another disastrous date, his truck breaks down in upscale Oceanside. When he thinks life can’t get any worse, a man who is the epitome of Boston elite and everything Bradley finds attractive and intimidating helps him move his truck to the side of the road. Ashamed of his lot in life, Bradley almost lets the opportunity slip away, but he comes to his senses in time and tracks Caleb down.

From a random act of kindness, romance begins to grow, filling all the dark corners of Bradley’s empty life—until a random act of violence threatens to take it all away. Bradley must step up and be the man Caleb believes him to be. Caleb rescued him from a life without hope. Can Bradley rescue him in return?

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Review:  I absolutely LOVED this book for the first five hours of Random Acts! Bradley is just enough of a cad that I hated him in the beginning but couldn’t help but root for him to be the better man I knew he could be.

Caleb, from beginning to end, was simply adorable and just enough of a sweetie that he truly brought out the best in Bradley, and I adored watching Bradley grow into this amazing man. Bradley’s family was fantastic, and all of Caleb and Brad’s interactions in this story simply blew me away. If this book had ended as a simple love story at around 60%, I’d have rated the book 5 stars. Unfortunately, though, when I looked at the time while enjoying it, I was saying, how can there still be three hours left in this story?

Then the random attack on Caleb happened, and the book took a complete nosedive for me. Character traits of Caleb’s, which were absolutely never even alluded to, were introduced, such as his severe depression and his family’s involvement in that depression. Random Acts changed from a wonderful and sweet love story toward a weird and incomplete conclusion.

Narration: Iggy Toma is a new narrator to me, and he was an absolute joy to listen to. I truly am enjoying how many wonderful narrators I am listening to. It seems more quality narrations are coming down the pipe as of late. He did a wonderful job of keeping me listening, even though this was a book I would have potentially put down. He did a great job with the accents and the female characters throughout the book. I look forward to listening to him again.

TNA_Signature_Amy

 

 

 

You can buy Random Acts here:

Audible.com

Audible.com

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CoolDudes Publishing, Giveaways, Mia Kerick

Guest Post and Giveaway: The Love Spell Blog Tour With Mia Kerick

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The Novel Approach welcomes author Mia Kerick today on her Love Spell blog tour. Enjoy the mini-interview we did together, then be sure to enter for the chance to win a $25 Amazon Gift Card by clicking on the Rafflecopter widget below.

Good luck!

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TNA: Hi, Mia, it’s good to have you back for a visit.

Mia: Thank you. As always (I write a lot of books) I am thrilled to be here!!

TNA: Could you come up with a paragraph or two (or more) for us about your writing process?

Mia: I start the writing process by doing research on what is going to be the major theme of the book. This constitutesa good part of the hard work I conduct prior to the fun stuff, which is the creating of characters. (Character creation=frosting on the cupcake.) For Love Spell, my research focused on gender confusion. I had a concept in my mind of Chance César—a teenage boy who is quite in touch with his feminine side, even admitting he wishes, at times, that he were a girl. But he has no urge to physically transition to become a woman or even to live his life as a woman. Chance just wants to be all-girl sometimes, all-boy others, and a little bit of each in-between.

After researching the theme I will tackle, I spend time creating a rough version of a plot. This part is difficult and intense. For the most part, I just sit and think. I think about popular culture, events in the news, what kinds of things kids deal with everyday, current music, and music that spoke to me as a teenager. Themes of different song lyrics give me ideas, as do people I see in real life and issues I am confronted with on social media. Sometimes I even think about fairy tales to get plot ideas. This can feel like a desperate time for me until I have the plot idea, and then I feel AWESOME.

The next step in my writing process involves creating a very rough outline of the events that will take place in the story. I do not use a standard outline form, just a long rambling list.

And then the fun part—creating the characters. I take the mental image I have conceived and flesh it out fully. First I write a description of the character’s personality and appearance, very detailed, and then I search for visual images. This part is fun, but can be tough. I do not stop until I have a visual “YOU ARE MR. RIGHT” feeling about the image I have chosen for each character. My original mental image of Chance César was a Johnny Depp-as-a-pirate kind of guy-but with Edward Scissorhands hair in neon ORANGE. Heavy eyeliner included.

Time to start writing!!

TNA: Do you go into the writing of a book like Love Spell in a different mindset than you would, say, a book like Not Broken, Just Bent? Does the difference between writing a lighthearted book and one with a weightier theme affect your mood away from the computer, or are you able to leave your emotions at the keyboard when you step away?

Mia: Love Spell was so much fun to write, from the very birth of its concept. Similar to my mental preparation for writing The Red Sheet, I told myself that, as an author, I was just going to let myself go. I would write whatever I wanted—I’d break rules. And let my sense of humor show. Some of my most recent releases, like Here Without You, for example, required me to stay within a rigid structure. Each of the three young men in Here Without You had speech patterns and behaviors and pasts to which I had to stay consistent. Inclination involved two boys with a very certain mindset, that of devout Christians, and as such, they did not veer much from their life goals. Although they were learning and changing, I was to some extent restricted by these characters’ well-defined convictions.

Chance is “totes” different. He is unpredictable and wears no label. (He claims to hate labels but is constantly searching for one that would fit him, in terms of gender.) Writing about Chance was extremely freeing for me. And like I said, it was fun. I brainstormed creative use of language with my college-age daughter and we had a lot of laughs as I chose Chance’s unique style of verbal expression. I spent a lot of time on Urban Dictionary finding hip ways of saying everyday things.

Not Broken, Just Bent, on the other hand, and many of my other YA books, are, as you mentioned in the question, weighty in theme and plot. But althoughLove Spell’s plot is humorous and outwardly light-hearted, it contains a heavy theme, as well. Chance is dealing with gender confusion, and though he is an extremely upbeat sort of person, it drags him down. The difference between Chance and many of my other YA characters is how he deals with conflict—by spitting at it rather than avoiding it.

I do feel differently when I write humor than when I write drama. Humor fills my heart with a sense of joy—cheesy, but true. Drama fills my mind with anticipation, because I write with a constant sense of waiting for the moment when the paths of the two young lovers finally cross, and then for the moment when they meld together. Both are satisfying to me, but in completely different ways.

Thank you so much for welcoming me to your blog today! I hope everybody checks out Love Spell—a romantic comedy with an inner lining of poignancy!

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PhotoBlurb: Strutting his stuff on the catwalk in black patent leather pumps and a snug orange tuxedo as this year’s Miss (ter) Harvest Moon feels so very right to Chance César, and yet he knows it should feel so very wrong.

As far back as he can remember, Chance has been “caught between genders.” (It’s quite a touchy subject; so don’t ask him about it.) However, he does not question his sexual orientation. Chance has no doubt about his gayness—he is very much out of the closet at his rural New Hampshire high school, where the other students avoid the kid they refer to as “girl-boy.”

But at the local Harvest Moon Festival, when Chance, the Pumpkin Pageant Queen, meets Jasper Donahue, the Pumpkin Carving King, sparks fly. So Chance sets out, with the help of his BFF, Emily, to make “Jazz” Donahue his man.

An article in an online women’s magazine, Ten Scientifically Proven Ways to Make a Man Fall in Love with You (with a bonus love spell thrown in for good measure), becomes the basis of their strategy to capture Jazz’s heart.

Quirky, comical, definitely flamboyant, and with an inner core of poignancy, Love Spell celebrates the diversity of a gender-fluid teen.

Buy Links: Amazon | All Romance eBooks

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Mia KerickAbout the Author: Mia Kerick is the mother of four exceptional children—all named after saints—and five nonpedigreed cats—all named after the next best thing to saints, Boston Red Sox players. Her husband of twenty-two years has been told by many that he has the patience of Job, but don’t ask Mia about that, as it is a sensitive subject.

Mia focuses her stories on the emotional growth of troubled young people and their relationships, and she believes that physical intimacy has a place in a love story, but not until it is firmly established as a love story. As a teen, Mia filled spiral-bound notebooks with romantic tales of tortured heroes (most of whom happened to strongly resemble lead vocalists of 1980s big-hair bands) and stuffed them under her mattress for safekeeping. She is thankful to Dreamspinner Press, Harmony Ink Press, CoolDudes Publishing, and CreateSpace for providing her with alternate places to stash her stories.

Mia is a social liberal and cheers for each and every victory made in the name of human rights, especially marital equality. Her only major regret: never having taken typing or computer class in school, destining her to a life consumed with two-fingered pecking and constant prayer to the Gods of Technology.

Stop by Mia’s Blog with questions or comments, or simply share what’s on your mind. Find Mia on Facebook, Goodreads, Twitter, and Amazon.

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THE GIVEAWAY:

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A Sneak Peek At The Coming Week

Here’s a Sneak Peek at the Coming Week

Sneak Peek

Cheers, everyone, and welcome back to a quick look at what (or should I say who?) we have coming up for you in the week ahead. Thank you for stopping by!

Now, along with great giveaways and more reviews, here’s who we have on tap.

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Monday – Author Mickie B. Ashling helps us kick off our week with a visit on the Enforcing Emory blog tour

TuesdayMia Kerick joins us today on the Love Spell blog tour

And we’ll also have author Jessie G. in attendance on the Tricking Chase blog tour

WednesdayJane Davitt is our guest today on the Closing the Loop tour

Thursday – And today, we’ll welcome Silvia Violet on the Coming Clean blog tour

As well as author B.R. Sanders to discuss their new book Ariah

Friday Joy Lynn Field drops in today on the Blowing Off Steam blog tour

Also joining us is author Annabelle Jacobs on the Altered 2 blog tour

Saturday – Closing out the week, we have RJ Scott with us today on her Summer House tour

And we’ll also welcome author Megan Linden on the Serve & Protect blog tour

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And that does it for the week ahead. Enjoy! And until next time, happy reading!

 

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4 Stars, Dreamspinner Press, Genre Romance, Mia Kerick, Reviewed by Karen

Review: Here Without You by Mia Kerick

Title:  Here Without You

Author:  Mia Kerick

Publisher:  Dreamspinner Press

Page/Word Count:  216 Pages

At a Glance:  While I did struggle a little with how I felt about Here Without You, I would also absolutely recommend the series to anyone. I’m looking forward with hope to more of my favorite throuple.

Reviewed By:  Karen

Blurb:  One Voice: Book Two

With all of his scratched and dented heart, Nate DeMarco wants to be two places at once, but he’s been forced to make an unbearable choice. Having barely survived high school, Nate and his boyfriends, Casey Minton and Zander Zane, are ready to move forward. Casey and Zander have left home to attend Boston City College. Nate remains in New Hampshire to protect his volatile younger sister from their increasingly violent, alcoholic uncle. Nate suffers with anger, resentment, and loneliness as what he wants battles against what he feels he must do.

Separated, the young men fight to stay in contact. But they are faced with separate issues. Casey copes with residual fear from having been bullied in high school. Zander obsesses over the establishment of One Voice, the gay-straight alliance at Boston City College. And Nate fights for his sister’s survival. Meanwhile, the intensity of the boys’ relationship increases, both sexually and emotionally.

Nate’s effort to live two lives leads to tragedy, which threatens to blast their relationship apart before they can adjust to the changes in their lives. They must find their way back to a united path before it’s too late.

Review:  I am not sure exactly where to start with my review.  I read this book in less than a day and now have spent just about as much time going around and around in my head about what I was going to write, and how I was going to rate this.  I’m not exactly sure why I am struggling so much. I really liked the book…I did.  And once I got to the end, well, I was sad it ended, which happens with most books I really like, but it just felt like something was off for me in Here Without You.

This book is set about two years or so after Us Three. Casey and Zander are off to college, while Nate stays home to keep his sister safe.  Where Us Three seems to have a focus on Casey, this book leans more towards Nate.  I love Nate, I love all the guys, but I think the reason I’m struggling a little is because as much as love the guys, and watching their relationship continue and evolve, it seemed slightly repetitive to me.  This wasn’t because of the three points of view, which I think is awesome. I’m always wondering what the other character is thinking, with this series there is no reason to wonder, and I think that’s great.  So, while I did struggle a little with how I felt about Here Without You, I would also absolutely recommend the series to anyone. I’m looking forward with hope to more of my favorite throuple.

TNA_Signature_Karen

 

 

 

You can buy Here Without You here:

All Romance eBooks

All Romance eBooks

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CoolDudes Publishing, Giveaways, Mia Kerick

Guest Post and Giveaway: The Inclination Blog Tour With Mia Kerick

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The Novel Approach welcomes Mia Kerick on the Inclination blog tour. For her visit, I asked Mia this question:

Religion is a divisive topic that, in one way or another, always seems to be in the forefront of social issues in the LGBT community. Why did you want to take on such a weighty subject in a Young Adult book, and what would you say is the primary message you hope readers will take away from Inclination?

Check out what Mia has to say on the subject, then be sure to click on the Rafflecopter widget below for the chance to win one of three e-books from Mia’s backlist.

Good luck!

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Mia: Raised a strict Catholic, I struggled since childhood with the rules-oriented nature of my religion. But knowing the rules, and living by them are two different stories. I have long struggled with the nature of the rules in Christianity, but only recently have I thought to examine the intentions behind these rules. And this struggle began when I was a teen, as many major life tend to issues show themselves at this time, which is in short why I addressed a weighty topic like this in a YA novel. And as a teen and a young adult, my major source of stress in this rules-following arena was, like Anthony, in regard to sexuality. Not in regard to my orientation, but in regard to my thoughts and actions.

In preparing to write Inclination, which had a working title of His Way, I did A LOT of research about same-sex behavior, and scriptural passages regarding this, found in the Old and New Testaments of the Bible, so my remarks will focus on Gay Christianity, rather than on other religions. This is not meant to exclude other religions from the discussion; however, I only want to speak about the specific topic I studied.I will repeat, I did A LOT of research. Maybe too much. This led to my first few drafts of Inclination sounding a little textbook-ish—Christian doctrine textbook, if you know what I mean. In respect to LGBT Christianity, I learned much of the pertinent Biblical passages from many different sources that pointed out both sides of the issue. My kitchen island workspace much resembled David’s chaotic kitchen table in the novel.A research project that matters more that an A grade or pat on your head from your parents because you did a good job… for David, and for myself, to some extent, this was a research paper about salvation.

In the course of my research, I watched a video where gay and lesbian Christian teens (not actors) were interviewed about their lives as homosexuals in Christian churches. What I saw made me cry. These kids LOVED GOD more than I can put into words, but they suffered as if they were evil sinners, or destined to be sinners, if they acted on their orientations. These teens were desperate, guilty, heartbroken. Many were trying to be something they were not—heterosexual. They wanted to be straight. They prayed that they could and would be changed, but to no avail. Others had given up on Christianity because they just couldn’t manage to stifle their true sexuality. Some prepared themselves to live a life alone, with no intimate companion. Others attempted to take their own lives.

I asked myself, how can I NOT address this subject as a Young Adult novel?

So, what message would I like readers to come away with after reading Inclination? The big picture message I hope readers take is that God loves gay Christians. But that is a big picture, and I realize that many Christians look to the Bible for the specifics. So, I hope readers will read with an open mind through David’s basic explanations to Anthony of very detailed scriptural analysis. I hope readers will see that the Bible is subject to human interpretation. And that it is not illogical to interpret that the intention of the Scripture is not as simple as “you shall not lie with a man as with a woman,” but that it is referring to a behavior far more complicated. And for those as detail-obsessed as I can be, that even when you get down to the nitty-gritty of the scripture, you will be able to see that there is a way of understanding the “clobber passages” (the passages that seem to condemn homosexuality) that is not at all anti-gay, but is instead, anti-excessive lustfulness, anti-selfishness, anti-inhospitality. And that readers will trust in what they know of Jesus—that he is not even slightly obsessed by the rules but instead by the essence of Christianity, which is love.

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1741016Blurb: Sixteen-year-old Anthony Duck-Young Del Vecchio is a nice Catholic boy with a very big problem. It’s not the challenge of fitting in as the lone adopted South Korean in a close-knit family of Italian-Americans. Nor is it being the one introverted son in a family jam-packed with gregarious daughters. Anthony’s problem is far more serious—he is the only gay kid in Our Way, his church’s youth group. As a high school junior, Anthony has finally come to accept his sexual orientation, but he struggles to determine if a gay man can live as a faithful Christian. And as he faces his dilemma, there are complications. After confiding his gayness to his intolerant adult youth group leader, he’s asked to find a new organization with which to worship. He’s beaten up in the church parking lot by a fanatical teen. His former best pal bullies him in the locker room. His Catholic friends even stage an intervention to lead him back to the “right path.” Meanwhile, Anthony develops romantic feelings for David Gandy, an emo, out and proud junior at his high school, who seems to have all the answers about how someone can be gay and Christian, too.

Will Anthony be able to balance his family, friends and new feelings for David with his changing beliefs about his faith so he can live a satisfying life and not risk his soul in the process?

Buy Links: CoolDudes | Amazon US | All Romance eBooks

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Mia KerickAuthor Bio: Mia Kerick is the mother of four exceptional children—all named after saints—and five nonpedigreed cats—all named after the next best thing to saints, Boston Red Sox players. Her husband of twenty-two years has been told by many that he has the patience of Job, but don’t ask Mia about that, as it is a sensitive subject.

Mia focuses her stories on the emotional growth of troubled young people and their relationships, and she believes that physical intimacy has a place in a love story, but not until it is firmly established as a love story. As a teen, Mia filled spiral-bound notebooks with romantic tales of tortured heroes (most of whom happened to strongly resemble lead vocalists of 1980s big-hair bands) and stuffed them under her mattress for safekeeping. She is thankful to Dreamspinner Press, Harmony Ink Press, Cool Dudes, and CreateSpace for providing her with alternate places to stash her stories.

Mia is a social liberal and cheers for each and every victory made in the name of human rights, especially marital equality. Her only major regret: never having taken typing or computer class in school, destining her to a life consumed with two-fingered pecking and constant prayer to the Gods of Technology.

Social Media Links: Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest

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THE GIVEAWAY:

Rafflecopter Giveaway

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Pride Promotions

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A Sneak Peek At The Coming Week, Giveaways

Here’s A Sneak Peek At The Coming Week

Sneak PeekCheers, everyone, and welcome back for a wee peek at all the fun and fantastic guests we have in store for you in the coming week. Articles, interviews, release day celebrations and giveaways galore will accompany another week of reviews here at The Novel Approach, and we can’t wait to share it all with you.

Here’s what’s on tap!

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MondaySkylar M. Cates kicks off the week on the Here for You blog tour

Cardeno C. joins us today as well, on the Home Series blog tour

TuesdayJordan Castillo Price is here today to celebrate the release of the third and final book in the Mnevermind trilogy, Life is Awesome, with an interview

Wednesday – Today, Silvia Violet stops by on the Burning Up blog tour

ThursdaySusan Mac Nicol joins us on the Sight and Sinner blog tour

FridayMia Kerick drops by today on the Inclination blog tour

We’ll also have author JT Cheyenne with us on the Ansleigh’s Grotto blog tour

SaturdayRJ Scott is our guest today with an interview on the Max and the Prince blog tour

Sunday – And finally, to close out a busy week, we have author Eli Easton with us on the Howl at the Moon blog tour

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And that brings another week to a close. Until next time, happy reading!

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Dreamspinner Press, Giveaways, Mia Kerick

Guest Post and Giveaway: The Here Without You Blog Tour With Mia Kerick

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The Novel Approach is happy to have Mia Kerick with us today on the Here Without You blog tour.

I asked Mia the question: You’ve probably been asked this question more than once, but I’m going to ask again. Given that a relationship between two people has its own complexities, how difficult do you find writing a ménage relationship? Did you find while writing the books in this series that there were certain things you had to explore more deeply, or things you needed to touch on that don’t exist with a couple? What are some of things you paid particular attention to while writing?

See what Mia has to say, then be sure to click on the Rafflecopter widget below for the chance at a $25 All Romance eBooks Gift Card.

Good luck!

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Mia: Hello, thank you so much for welcoming me at The Novel Approach, and for asking me such a thoughtful question.

I found that writing the story of Casey, Zander, and Nate’s love, came very naturally to me. I realize it might seem as if developing the story of a YA threesome would have been quite complex, and there were indeed complexities, but since the three boys were very young when they met and fell in love, they were all still open to new and different, and even, unconventional, experiences and relationships. When Casey, Zander, and Nate were exposed to each other during the process of completing a group French project in their junior year of high school, they were still in their most formative years, emotionally speaking. And when they started to really see each other—not just as “the burnout loser”, “the preppy jock”, and the “effeminate nerd”—but as the human beings inside those shells, they really couldn’t help but fall in love. The reason for this was that each boy possessed strengths and weaknesses in his personality that allowed them to fit together like puzzle pieces.

There were some areas, however, in which I had to be very careful as I wrote. One of these areas was in what I’ll call “the relationship-balance” of the three boys. I had to be certain that the relationship never seemed to favor the closeness of two of the boys over another one. Now, since I knew the boys better than anybody else, I knew that their love was like an equilateral triangle, with no joining of two sides being stronger or closer, or in any way better, than any other. My challenge was to be sure that the reading audience knew that this was the case. And I will admit that several Us Threereviews suggested that Casey and Nate were the “primary” couple, or that Casey and Zander loved each other more than they loved Nate, but I believe that I have stated in both stories, Us Three and Here Without You, that both Nate and Zander considered Casey to be their “glue”, because he was soft and sweet and open and he easily brought them all together, where they were both more reserved and quiet. But this in no way means that the love was stronger between any pairing within this threesome.

In Here Without You, I paid extremely close attention to the sexually intimate aspects of the three boys’ relationship so it was balanced. Two of the boys were going off to college to be roommates, and one was staying home in New Hampshire alone. Would the two in Boston be intimate when the third wasn’t there? The boys very purposefully set their own rules for how they would handle this, and their openness in this area allowed for even further trust to grow as a result of what you might think wouldcause friction. And when the three made love, I had to be careful that every moment of the intimacy was fully shared by all three, no matter what specific action each boy was engaged in.

Casey calls their unconventional partnership a throuple, which combines the word couple with the word three. I really think of Casey, Zander, and Nate’s relationship as very similar to that of a devoted couple, but there just so happen to be three people involved. The young men realize over the course of Here Without You that without all three members, their relationship cannot exist as a romance.

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1732857Blurb – Here Without You: With all of his scratched and dented heart, Nate DeMarco wants to be two places at once, but he’s been forced to make an unbearable choice. Having barely survived high school, Nate and his boyfriends, Casey Minton and Zander Zane, are ready to move forward in life. Casey and Zander have left home to attend Boston City College. Nate remains in New Hampshire to protect his volatile younger sister from their increasingly violent, alcoholic uncle. Nate suffers with anger, resentment, and loneliness as he battles what he wants against what he feels he must do.

Now separated, the young men fight to stay in contact. However, they’re each faced with their own separate issues. Casey must cope with residual fear from having been bullied in high school. Zander obsesses over the establishment of One Voice, the new gay-straight alliance at Boston City College. Nate fights for his sister’s very survival. Meanwhile, the intensity of the boys’ relationship increases, both sexually and emotionally, as happens in long distance relationships.

Nate’s futile effort to live two lives leads to tragedy, which blasts Nate, Casey, and Zander apart. Can the three young men find their way back to a united path before it’s too late?

Buy Links: Dreamspinner Press | Amazon US | All Romance eBooks

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Mia KerickAbout the Author: Mia Kerick is the mother of four exceptional children—all named after saints—and five nonpedigreed cats—all named after the next best thing to saints, Boston Red Sox players. Her husband of twenty-two years has been told by many that he has the patience of Job, but don’t ask Mia about that, as it is a sensitive subject.

Mia focuses her stories on the emotional growth of troubled young people and their relationships, and she believes that physical intimacy has a place in a love story, but not until it is firmly established as a love story. As a teen, Mia filled spiral-bound notebooks with romantic tales of tortured heroes (most of whom happened to strongly resemble lead vocalists of 1980s big-hair bands) and stuffed them under her mattress for safekeeping. She is thankful to Dreamspinner Press, Harmony Ink Press, and CreateSpace for providing her with alternate places to stash her stories.

Mia is a social liberal and cheers for each and every victory made in the name of human rights, especially marital equality. Her only major regret: never having taken typing or computer class in school, destining her to a life consumed with two-fingered pecking and constant prayer to the Gods of Technology.

Social Media Links: Blog | Facebook | Dreamspinner Author Arcade | Goodreads | Twitter

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THE GIVEAWAY:

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A Sneak Peek At The Coming Week

Here’s A Sneak Peek At The Coming Week

Sneak Peek

Cheers, everyone, and thanks for coming by to see what we have in store for you in the week ahead. It’s shaped up to be another busy one–loads of guest authors, blog tours, giveaways just for you, and, of course, books. It wouldn’t be a week if we didn’t talk about books. 

Now, here’s what’s on tap.

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Monday – Author Felice Stevens is going to kick off our week for us on her blog tour for Memories of the Heart

We’ll also have Hayden Thorne joining us today to talk about her new book Sheridan Diggins and the Dead Horde

Tuesday – We’re helping Jaime Reese celebrate the release of the newest addition to the Men of Halfway House series, A Restored Man

We’ll also be helping to reveal the cover for Lou Sylvre’s A Shot of J&B, the next generation in the Vasquez and James series

Guest columnist and author Brita Addams also joins us today with her monthly article

Wednesday – Today we’ll be hosting author Con Riley on the True Brit blog tour

And joining her as our guest will be Sean Michael on the Love Matters tour

ThursdayJay Northcote drops in on the Passing Through blog tour

Jessie G. will also be with us today on The Protector blog tour

FridayMia Kerick is stopping by today on the Here Without You blog tour

We’ll also welcome Riptide Publishing and Cari Z., a contributing author in the Rules to Live By anthology

Saturday – Finally, to close out this busy week, we’ll have author Lillian Francis on the Theory Unproven blog tour

Louise Lyons also joins on the In Darkest Peru blog tour

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And that does it for us for this week. Until next time, happy reading!

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Dreamspinner Press, Mia Kerick

Guest Post and Giveaway: Random Questions From Random Readers For The Random Acts Blog Tour by Mia Kerick

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I’ve never been particularly comfortable with the random parts of life. Like my character Caleb Jorde, in Random Acts, I would prefer to know what’s coming in life and to be afforded with plenty of opportunity to structure my world into clear emotional categories in order to prepare. That way I’d be ready for any tragedy and any joy. For anything and everything life could toss my way—this girl would be ready.

But maybe that’s not such a good idea after all… Maybe it’s best to savor the awesome moments as they occur, and to deal with the hardships on a need to be dealt with basis. Maybe life can be random and maybe that’s a good thing.

Maybe that good part of random can start with these random questions from my readers.
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Carole Cummings, Charlie Cochet, Cornelia Grey, Eileen Griffin, Jack Byrne, L.A. Witt, Liz Borino, Mia Kerick, Mickie B. Ashling, Nikka Michaels, Rain Carrington, Sneak Peek, Sue Brown, Whitley Gray

A Giveaway and A Sneak Peek At The Coming Week

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Hi, everyone, and welcome back to another look at what we have coming up for you in the week ahead.

First, though, in case you missed it, The Novel Approach is hosting a giveaway over at Mary Calmes’s Blog for our Book of the Month picks in October. There’s a chance to win TWO of the dozen e-books we each selected as October’s best, so be sure to head on over there before Midnight Pacific time on November 4 to enter for a chance to win.

Good luck!

And now, here’s who we have in store for you in the coming week, more great guests, interviews, blog tours, giveaways, and, of course, reviews.

 

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MondayNikka Michaels and Eileen Griffin stop in on their In the Fire blog tour

Cornelia Grey is also our guest on the Circus of the Damned blog tour

TuesdayMickie B. Ashling is here on the Cutting Out blog tour

Whitley Gray drops by with an interview on the Crash Pad blog tour

WednesdayL.A. Witt is our guest on the Starstruck blog tour

Rain Carrington comes calling to do a little promo for her two upcoming releases, Crazy Little Man Called Love and Road Runner

ThursdayCarole Cummings is our guest today to talk a little bit about the launch of Dreamspinner Publications

Charlie Cochet is also here today on the Rack & Ruin blog tour

FridayMia Kerick drops in on the Random Acts blog tour

RJ Scott joins us on her Darach (Fire: Book Two) blog tour

SaturdayLiz Borino makes TNA a stop on the No Time for Secrets blog tour

And finally, Jack Byrne is back to talk about the new anthology Hot Off the Press

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And that does it for this week. Until next time, happy reading!

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Harmony Ink Press, Mia Kerick, Reviewed by Tina

Mia Kerick’s “The Red Sheet” Will Make You A Believer – Reviewed by Tina


“Only a man in a funny red sheet.
Looking for special things inside of me, inside of
me, inside of me.” – Five For Fighting (John Ondrasik)


Title: The Red Sheet

Author: Mia Kerick

Publisher: Harmony Ink Press

Pages/Word Count: 190 Pages

Rating: 5 Stars

Blurb: One October morning, high school junior Bryan Dennison wakes up a different person—helpful, generous, and chivalrous—a person whose new admirable qualities he doesn’t recognize. Stranger still is the urge to tie a red sheet around his neck like a cape.
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Harmony Ink Press, Mia Kerick

Mia Kerick Stops By On The Last Leg Of “The Red Sheet” Blog Tour, And There’s A Giveaway!



BLURB:One October morning, high school junior Bryan Dennison wakes up a different person—helpful, generous, and chivalrous—a person whose new admirable qualities he doesn’t recognize. Stranger still is the urge to tie a red sheet around his neck like a cape.

Bryan soon realizes this compulsion to wear a red cape is accompanied by more unusual behavior. He can’t hold back from retrieving kittens from tall trees, helping little old ladies cross busy streets, and defending innocence anywhere he finds it.

Shockingly, at school, he realizes he used to be a bully. He’s attracted to the former victim of his bullying, Scott Beckett, though he has no memory of Scott from before “the change.” Where he’d been lazy in academics, overly aggressive in sports, and socially insecure, he’s a new person. And although he can recall behaving egotistically, he cannot remember his motivations.

Everyone, from his mother to his teachers to his “superjock” former pals, is shocked by his dramatic transformation. However, Scott Beckett is not impressed by Bryan’s newfound virtue. And convincing Scott he’s genuinely changed and improved, hopefully gaining Scott’s trust and maybe even his love, becomes Bryan’s obsession.

With a foreword by C. Kennedy

Book Links:
Dreamspinner Ι Goodreads

Excerpt:

“YOU LOOK like something the cat dragged in.”

“Thanks.” I dropped my tray down on the SJL Table and sat in the chair beside Scott. I also did my best not to look across the cafeteria at the Superjock Table, but I could still feel them staring.
“What happened?” So maybe, at the moment, I was slightly stunned and was having trouble believing Scott actually gave a shit, but I didn’t voice that thought. He tilted his head and studied me. I knew he was sizing up my facial injuries. “You got beat up.”

“No, I didn’t.”

“I know ‘beat up’ when I see it—personal experience, you know?”

“It was just a minor misunderstanding, that’s all.”

“With those guys’ fists?” Scott nodded in the direction of the five jocks who all happened to be staring at me menacingly from their spot in the center of the cafeteria.

“Maybe.” I bit down into my meatball sub.

This sandwich is not bad at all. I’ll be sure to compliment its spicy Italian tastiness to the kitchen cooks.

“Did they mess you up at basketball tryouts?”

“Afterward.”

“On account of the fact that you’ve been sitting with me at lunch every day?”

“Not on account of anything but their ignorance. I’m hoping that they’ll learn to see the error of their ways.”

“F-fat ch-chance!” David called to me from where he sat several seats away. “Those g-guys will never l-learn… p-person-nal ex-ex-perience for m-me too.”

“Well, I changed.”

Scott glanced up from his yogurt and raisins. He again studied me critically. “Have you, really?”
“I’d like to think so.”

Before Scott looked back down at his bowl, I thought he might have smiled.

Guest Post:

As an author of both Young Adult and adult romantic gay fiction I have often examined this question: What is the true difference between YA and adult literature? How does it apply to my books?

To illustrate my point, please note that my adult book, Beggars and Choosers, has been a monthly discussion group topic on the YA Group LGBT Books, as has my YA novel, Not Broken, Just Bent. So, clearly, both my adult and YA writing style meets the criteria for being YA romantic fiction. In addition, Out of Hiding was originally intended as a YA novel, but the editors hinted that the characters seemed too mature for YA, so I decided to rework it to make it Adult novel. Interestingly, some readers suggested that the voice of the speaker, Philippe seemed very young for an adult.

One reviewer, Dani, on Goodreads, said about Out of Hiding,

It read very, very young and overly innocent, very YA/NA. The MCs are 20 and 21; Sophie is 17. There was sex, yes, but very, very muted.

And T.M. Smith reviewed Out of Hiding, as well, on Goodreads, saying, “My only complaint was the intimacy between the two ML. It was as if a tug of war was going between a Mature YA rating and a New Adult rating. I just wanted Kerick to choose one side or the other. There were scenes where less racy, more passionate was appropriate. But there were also times I wanted Dario to rock his socks off, and it didn’t quite make it there.” So, clearly, my readers, too, sense the “tug of war” between the YA and Adult natures of my writing.

So, instead of taking offense to these honest reviews, I decided I would learn from them. I did some research. I examined blogs and Goodreads’ discussions, as well as looked at the standard Wikipedia definitions. Wikipedia states:

A young adult, according to Erik Erikson’s stages of human development, is generally a person in the age range of 20 to 40, whereas an adolescent is a person aging from 13 to 19,[1][2] although definitions and opinions vary. The young adult stage in human development precedes middle adulthood.

And of Young Adult Fiction, Wikipedia says:

Young-adult fiction or young adult literature (often abbreviated as YA),[1] also juvenile fiction, is fiction written, published, or marketed to adolescents and young adults, although recent studies show that 55% of young-adult fiction is purchased by readers over 18 years of age.[2] The Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA) of the American Library Association (ALA) defines a young adult as someone between the ages of twelve and eighteen. Authors and readers of young adult (YA) novels often define the genre as literature as traditionally written for ages ranging from sixteen years up to the age of twenty-five, while Teen Fiction is written for the ages of ten and to fifteen.[3] The terms young-adult novel, juvenile novel, young-adult book, etc. refer to the works in the YA category.[4]

It seems that all of my books, so far, have generally fit into the Young Adult Fiction genre as described here.

In the blog “How to Write a Book”, Terrell from Columbia, MO, made some statements in his entry that hit home to me.

In YA it is a teenage voice that tells the story, and the attitude of that voice (whether in first or limited third person narration) is a teenage attitude: excessively concerned with subjective matters that an adult voice would not be concerned with or would have more objectivity on.

Teenage voices speak more as teenagers think they do, and not as adults think they do. Teenage characters tend to be concerned with what others think of them, whether they fit in, how can they prove themselves, how they are judged by others or by themselves, role models, how to cope with social pressure, parental pressure, romantic desires, and other serious problems. Unlike adults, teens don’t have decades of experience with such problems to draw upon. Hence, uncertainty and snap judgements are key issues at that age. – See more at: http://www.how-to-write-a-book-now.com/difference-betweenya-adult-fiction.html#sthash.yFSrY278.zjYX25h5.dpuf

I completely agree with Terrell. It is voice that makes a YA book truly work for the YA audience. However, since I write romance, the question of sexuality often enters my mind as a challenging area. How much sex is too much sex for YA- and when does a novel turn the bend, sexually-speaking, into an adult novel? Again, I will refer to what Terrell says:

Finally, sexuality is different in YA not just because many adults don’t want their teens reading graphic descriptions, but also because YA readers want to read about people who are approaching sexuality with the same feelings and lack of experience they have. (In my opinion, reading YA novels is a safe way for some teens to explore and reflect on their feelings about sexuality and romance and prepare themselves for adult life, but not everyone agrees.)
– See more at: http://www.how-to-write-a-book-now.com/difference-betweenya-adult-fiction.html#sthash.yFSrY278.zjYX25h5.dpuf

I believe that in YA sexual content should be quite reflective; not so much describing the titillation as the expectations, the sense of uncertainty—all of the emotion that rush in when a young adult person is experiencing a significant event such as sexual intimacy.

Another blogger outlines what, in her opinion, are specific characteristics of YA literature. In her blog, “Let the Words Flow”, Susan Dennard states:

So…I think the biggest differences between YA and adult boil down to:
. the voice
. the length (though that is changing these days)
. how the MC views him/herself in the world and reacts to his/her surroundings
. the depth of the POV

Dennard outlines her perspective on each of the above, saying that the voice must feel authentic to a teenager; inauthentic voice being the primary reason publishers reject YA submissions. I heartily agree that authentic voice is critical. The word count issue, I realize, comes into play here, as there are certain word counts considered more appropriate for YA fiction, however, I tend to tell the story and the word count is the number of words that I need to tell it properly. But in regard to word count, most of my novels are of appropriate length for a shorter adult or a mid-sized YA romance. The third point Dennard outlines is, in my opinion, critical—how the main character sees himself in the world. Largely, this is what a YA book is about—finding one’s place in the world. And finally, I personally need to live in the main character’s head in order for a YA novel to work for me. So, in general, I agree with all of Susan Dennard’s points.

However, I believe all of my books, YA and adult, share most of these characteristics. SO this leads me back to the question what is the true difference between YA and adult literature? And how does this apply to categorizing my romance novels?

In a Goodreads discussion about Young Adult vs. adult literature, of August 2013, Caity commented:

I personally have found that labels like Young Adult, Fantasy, Mystery, Romance, etc. are exactly that. They’re just labels, similar to labels that people face every day (especially growing up), like nerd, jock, prep, etc.

Labels are limiting, possibly stereotyping. I agree with Caity on that conclusion. She goes on to state:

In a similar sense, Young Adult is also a label. Sure, the writing may not be as poetic as Charles Dickins and the themes may not be as complex and deep-running as Crime and Punishment, but putting the words Young Adult on the cover doesn’t mean that it can’t hit home with a 50 year old Wall Street businessman. A less complex writing style doesn’t mean that the writing has been ‘dumbed down’ so that it is not suitable for adults, either. It means that the writing style is that which is readable and understandable by a younger audience as well as an older audience. I’ve found myself, as a 22-year-old college graduate, reading more YA fiction than anything else lately, because of the stories that are told and the way it lets me escape to another time in my life – and not all of my memories of my younger years are good ones.

Should we apply “labels” to categorize fictional works, and if we do, should it be more in the form of measures to safeguard those under eighteen from topics that they are not emotionally ready to fully deal with?

There are no clear or easy answers to the questions that prompted me to write tis post. So, I will state my truth as an author, and hope that it resonates with my current readers and draws in new readers who share my belief.

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Having expressed my focus as a writer, I will urge you as an adult or a young adult reader to check out my new release, The Red Sheet. It is listed as Young Adult at Harmony Ink Press and it, indeed, deals with the struggles of two male characters who are high school juniors. The voice is that of a rather witty and self-deprecating seventeen-year-old boy, who has experienced a life-changing “miracle” that has forced him to contemplate every aspect of who he is. The Red Sheet deals with the topics of bullying, fitting into your surroundings, as well as making tough choices that lead to true change. It deals with the concept of forgiveness as mandatory to both the person who has done wrong as well as the person who has been wronged. These concepts are not just pertinent to young adult readers, but to all readers.


031014_1105_MiaKerickIs3.jpgAbout the Author: Mia Kerick is the mother of four exceptional children—all named after saints—and five nonpedigreed cats—all named after the next best thing to saints, Boston Red Sox players. Her husband of twenty years has been told by many that he has the patience of Job, but don’t ask Mia about that, as it is a sensitive subject.

Mia focuses her stories on the emotional growth of troubled men and their relationships, and she believes that sex has a place in a love story, but not until it is firmly established as a love story. As a teen, Mia filled spiral-bound notebooks with romantic tales of tortured heroes (most of whom happened to strongly resemble lead vocalists of 1980s big-hair bands) and stuffed them under her mattress for safekeeping. She is thankful to Dreamspinner Press for providing her with an alternate place to stash her stories.

Mia is proud of her involvement with the Human Rights Campaign and cheers for each and every victory made in the name of marital equality. Her only major regret: never having taken typing or computer class in school, destining her to a life consumed with two-fingered pecking and constant prayer to the Gods of Technology.

My themes I always write about:

Sweetness. Unconventional love, tortured/damaged heroes- only love can save them.

Author Links:

Website | Facebook | Amazon

THE GIVEAWAY: Mia Kerick is offering a Tour Wide Giveaway via Rafflecopter. It ends soon, though, so if you haven’t entered, do it quickly!

CLICK HERE TO ENTER

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A Sneak Peek At The Coming Week, Amelia C. Gormley, Grace R. Duncan, Hayden Thorne, Heidi Belleau, Jackie Nacht, K.A. Merikan, Liz Borino, Mia Kerick, RainbowCon, Riley Hart, Sara York, SE Jakes

Here’s A Sneak Peek At The Coming Week



Hi, everyone, I hope you’ve all had an outstanding week and are looking forward to a great week ahead. We’ve got a busy one coming up here at The Novel Approach, so check out who we’ve got on tap to bring all the fun right to you!

MondayGrace R. Duncan kicks the week off with a RainbowCon Celebration, and she’s offering a giveaway

Riptide Publishing will also be bringing Heidi Belleau and Amelia C. Gormley on the To the Very Last Inch Blog Tour

TuesdayMia Kerick is our guest on The Red Sheet Blog Tour, and there’ll be a giveaway

Riley Hart is also elevating the anticipation of her next release, Stay, book two in the Blackcreek series, with a purty smexy cover reveal!

WednesdayJackie Nacht will be here with us on the Full Moon Blog Tour, answering a few questions , and there’s a Rafflecopter Giveaway

A.J. Corza’s also back today with another fabulous installment of “Got You Covered”

ThursdayK.A. Merikan drops by today on the Copper Horse Blog Tour

FridaySara York has us covered on the Pray the Gay Away Blog Tour

Riptide Publishing is back today to bring SE Jakes to us, on the Free Falling Blog Tour

Saturday – You’ve already seen a sneak peek of Liz Borino’s Angel’s Hero this morning, so be sure to stay tuned for more from her “Angel” Blog Tour

SundayHayden Thorne is our guest, talking about your YA Historical Fantasy Renfred’s Masquerade, and she’s offering a giveaway of the book

And that does it for this week. Until next time, happy reading!

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Dreamspinner Press, Mia Kerick

Out of Hiding By Mia Kerick Creeps Into Your Heart And Leaves It Changed Forever!


“Don’t give in to your fears. If you do, you won’t be able to talk to your heart.” – Paul Coehlo



Title: Out of Hiding

Author: Mia Kerick

Publisher: Dreamspinner Press

Pages/Word Count: 180 Pages

Rating: 5 Stars

Blurb: After graduating from high school early, twenty-year-old Philippe Bergeron spent the past several years lost among the stars while fishing off the New England coast. A shoulder injury ends his dream of living reclusively on the water, and he finds himself lost among the bright lights of New York City. His older brother, Henri, has asked Philippe to chaperone his seventeen-year-old niece, Sophie, on her tours of the city’s legendary dance programs.
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Harmony Ink Press, Mia Kerick

Mia Kerick Proves There’s Hope If You’re “Not Broken, Just Bent”

“Forgiveness requires a sense that bad behaviour is a sign of suffering rather than malice.” ― Alain de Botton

BLURB: Braving the start of high school, longtime childhood friends Benjamin Wells and Timmy Norton quickly realize they are entering a whole new world colored by their family responsibilities. Ben is trying to please his strict father; Timmy is taking care of his younger sisters. While their easy camaraderie is still comfortable, Ben notices Timmy growing distant and evasive, but Ben has his own problems. It’s easier to let concerns about Timmy’s home life slide, especially when Timmy changes directions and starts to get a little too close. Ben doesn’t know how to handle the new feelings Timmy’s desire for love inspires, and his continuing denial wounds Timmy deeply.

But what Timmy perceives as Ben’s greatest betrayal is yet to come, and the fallout threatens to break them apart forever. Over the next four years, the push and pull between them and the outside world twists and tears at Ben and Timmy, and they are haunted by fear and regret. However, sometimes what seems broken is just a little bent, and if they can find forgiveness within themselves, Ben and Timmy may be able to move forward together.

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Harmony Ink Press, Mia Kerick

Schedule Some Time With Mia Kerick’s “Intervention”



“There are tons of kids out there who endure chronic abuse and suffer in silence. They can’t trust anyone, they can’t tell anyone, and they have no idea how to get away from it.” — C. Kennedy


I have a hard time reading books containing incest. The subject matter is a heinous one and I laud author Mia Kerick for attempting to tackle it in her newest book. When I got to the first part in Intervention where the history of incest was clearly stated, I didn’t think I’d be able to read the book. But, I pressed on. I’m not sure if it had to do with the skilled way in which Ms. Kerick wrote it or my determination to get through a troubling story. I say all this to be sure you know where I was while reading Intervention.

**Warning: This Review Contains Spoilers**

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